Best Practices for construction safety

Hardly a month goes by without a construction site accident occurring, some of which are fatal. Perhaps this is why some people consider construction as one of the most dangerous jobs. The good news is that employers and employees can adopt a number of practices to mitigate the occurrence of safety hazards. Here are some of the key measures

  1. Safety awareness

Everyone involved in a construction project is often exposed to a certain degree of danger. Therefore, it is important that the manager in charge informs everybody involved of the possible hazards at the very beginning of the project. One of the best practices in this regard is to hold an interactive safety meeting where employees get to learn about construction laws and safety rules.

  1. Implement a reporting channel

A construction company should create and communicate a basic system for employees to report incidents, injuries, illness, accidents and other safety concerns. For instance, the employees should be equipped with devices such as phones that relay information efficiently to workmates and the manager. Additionally, the manager should communicate each day’s goals to avoid confusion which may result in safety hazards.

  1. Offer training

Workers should be trained to identify and mitigate hazards using standard guidelines. There are various resources that could be used for training including pamphlets, videos and class sessions. The training should be offered routinely to new and experienced workers.

  1. Protective gear

The risk of fatal accidents is reduced when workers are equipped with proper protective equipment. The equipment such as protective hats should be mandatory. Additionally, safety equipment and machines such as fire extinguishers should be available on site and should be in proper working condition.

  1. Regular Inspections

The manager in charge should inspect the construction site routinely and check the workers’ awareness of safety measures. Enforcement should be executed where there seems to be reluctance in adherence to safety measures.

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